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Developing a network for BME civil society organisations working with the Ministry of Justice

A series of FREE consultation events 2011

Choose from the following three consultation events being run by BTEG:

  1. London, 4th October, 2011

  2. Peterborough, 6th October, 2011

  3. Birmingham, 12th October, 2011

Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) civil society organisations play an important role in providing services for offenders, ex-offenders and their families. Some BAME communities experience disproportionately adverse outcomes throughout the justice system through their interface with the police, courts and prisons.

  1. London, 4th October, 2011

  2. Peterborough, 6th October, 2011

  3. Birmingham, 12th October, 2011

Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) civil society organisations play an important role in providing services for offenders, ex-offenders and their families. Some BAME communities experience disproportionately adverse outcomes throughout the justice system through their interface with the police, courts and prisons.

Despite various policy interventions, this disproportionality has not improved and continues to be a source of hardship for individuals, families and the wider society. BAME organisations have an important role to play in helping to reduce re-offending and helping to integrate offenders into their communities.

The shift to payment by results and the squeeze on government finances make it harder for small providers to compete for contracts.

BTEG believes BAME communities must have a voice at the local and national levels and be able to influence public and private bodies charged with managing the CJS.

The Ministry of Justice has recognised this and funded BTEG to establish a network for BAME organisations. We are also working in partnership with Clinks, the national umbrella agency for voluntary and community sector working in the CJS.

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